Pre-conference Workshops

Summary of confirmed pre-conference workshops:

Wednesday, 04 April 2018

 

MORNING

Antonella delle Fave & Silvia Koller: 

Emerging Scientist pre-conference workshop

Helena Marujo & Miguel Neto: 

Promoting sustainable, global and positive peace in everyday life: the role of participatory methods for community-based programs

Chiara Ruini:

Strategies to promote eudaimonic well-being across the lifespan: from childhood to older age

AFTERNOON

Ian Rothmann: 

Data analysis with Mplus: A gentle introduction

Paul Vorster:

The Psychology of “Bad”: Making Ethical Decisions in the Presence of Social Forces

 

Emerging Scientist pre-conference workshop
 Antonella delle Fave  Silvia Koller
Antonella Delle Fave  Silvia Helena Koller

Antonella Delle Fave

Antonella Delle Fave is professor of Psychology at the Medical School of the University of Milano, Italy. After getting an MD degree, she specialized in clinical psychology and devoted her research activities to the investigation of well-being indicators, with a particular attention to cultural and diversity issues. She developed research and intervention projects in the domains of health and education, and supervised international co-operation programs to promote resource implementation in conditions of disability and social maladjustment. Together with international partners she launched and implemented the “Eudaimonic and Hedonic Happiness Investigation”, aimed at identifying well-being components across cultures. She is currently conducting research and intervention projects on well-being promotion in conditions of chronic and degenerative diseases among patients and caregivers, exploring the potential of an integrated treatment approach. Her scientific production includes papers in peer-reviewed journals, as well as authored and edited books. She served as President of the International Positive Psychology Association (2009-2011) and of the European Network of Positive Psychology (2006-2010).  Since 2010 she is Editor in Chief of the Journal of Happiness Studies.

Silvia Koller

Silvia Helena KollerSilvia Helena Koller is Brazilian and works as a Full Professor and Chair of the Center for Psychological Studies of At-Risk Populations in the Department of Psychology at the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Currently, she is a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Graduate School of Education and a Visiting Scientist at Harvard T.H. Chan School f Public Health, as well as an Extraordinary Professor at North West University, in Vanderbijlpark, South Africa. She was awarded as Honorary Professor at Universidad de Chiclayo and Universidad Autónoma del Peru, Peru, and as the 2010 the Society for Research on Adolescence (SRA) International Fellow and the 2010 Association of Psychological Societies Fellow. Her commitment to the internationalization of knowledge in Psychology has led it to disseminate Brazilian research in various scientific associations around the world, taking various positions in international organizations, as well as publishing her research on high quality journals abroad. Affiliations: President of the Brazilian Association for Research and Graduate Studies in Psychology and of the Brazilian Society of Developmental Psychology; The Human Sciences Research Council and UNICEF consultant in Africa; Former Editor-in-chief of the Trends in Psychology, Interamerican Journal of Psychology and Psicologia: Reflexão e Crítica (Psychology) journals; Former Associate Editor of the International Journal of Behavioral Development (International Society for the Studies on Behavioural Development - ISSBD), and of the Child Development Abstracts & Bibliography (Society for Research in Child Development - SRCD); Ad hoc Representative of Latin America at the International Affairs Council. Executive Committee of the International Society for Research in Behavioral Development (ISSBD), and Society for Research on Adolescence (SRA). Member of the Scientific Committee of ISSBD Biennial Meetings (Belgium, Canada, Australia, Germany, Zambia, China and Lithuania). Her research focuses primarily on positive and ecological development and applied psychology, children’s rights, resilience, and prosocial moral development. Her papers have been published in several international and Brazilian journals. Jacobs Foundation, Kellogg Foundation, World Childhood Foundation (WCF), World Bank, Every Child and various Brazilian agencies have granted her research/intervention. She lectured at different universities around the world, such as North-West University (South Africa), University of Zurich (Switzerland), UIUC, UNL, UNC, and ASU (USA), Universidad del Valle, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Pontifical Universidad Católica Javeriana, and Universidad de Baranquilla (Colombia), Universidad San Marco, Pontifical Universidad Católica, Universidad Autónoma, and Universidad de Chiclayo (Peru), Pontifical Universidad Católica (Chile), and others. Her research team has been collaborating with researchers of the five continents. She participates in several outreach programs. She is also committed to building capacity among youth, and fostering young people’s awareness of their human rights, as well as programs for teachers

 

Strategies to promote eudaimonic well-being across the lifespan: from childhood to older age
 Chiara Ruini 
Chiara Ruini

Chiara Ruini

Chiara Ruini

Chiara Ruini, PhD. is Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Bologna, Department of Psychology. Since 2006 she has been teaching the course “Clinical Applications of Positive Psychology” for students attending the Master Program in Clinical Psychology. Chiara Ruini has authored more than 60 articles published in peer-reviewed international journals, has edited a book entitled “Increasing Psychological well-being across cultures” for the Springer series Positive Psychology across Cultures and serves the Editorial Boards for international Journals such as Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, the Psychology of Well-being, Theories Research and Practice,  The Journal of Happiness and Wellbeing, the International Journal of Applied Positive Psychology.  Her research interests are concerned with Positive Psychology, Clinical Psychology, Positive Youth Development, and Psychotherapy.

Title: Strategies to promote eudaimonic well-being across the lifespan: from childhood to older age

 

Topic: this talk will illustrate the different characteristics of eudaimonic well-being across various life stages (childhood, adulthood and later life), underlying its stability, but also its specific deficits, due to different challenges that individuals face across time. Based on previous clinical experience, specific interventions for the promotion of eudaimonic well-being and the prevention of psychological distress will be illustrated.  

Abstract:

Introduction: Psychological well-being is receiving increasing attention for its protective role for physical and mental health. Its promotion is thus crucial, particularly in vulnerable stages of life. The aim of this presentation is to provide an overview of interventions for the promotion of psychological well-being using a lifespan perspective.

Methods: Beginning with school children who received a class protocol based on narrative techniques, the presentation will move to teenagers and adults with affective disorders treated with Well-being therapy, to conclude with a positive narrative intervention designed for ageing populations living in nursing homes. The presentation will highlight the characteristics of psychological well-being according to the specific life stages, and the different techniques adopted to promote it, from standard CBT to behavioural activation and narrative strategies.

Results: Empirical results derived from these Italian experiences highlight that psychological well-being may be improved by brief, multidimensional interventions. Their beneficial effects are extended also to the abatement of symptomatology.

Conclusions: These interventions may represent a fruitful integration of positive psychology within the clinical practice. They may be applicable in different settings (educational, clinical, ageing communities) and represent cost-effective strategies for the prevention and treatment of psychological distress across the lifespan.

 

The Psychology of “Bad”: Making Ethical Decisions in the Presence of Social Forces
Paul Vorster

Paul Vorster

Dr. Paul Vorster earned a doctorate of philosophy degree in industrial/organisational psychology at the University of Johannesburg in 2016. He has specialised in psychometric assessment and research and has worked in areas of applied research, psychometrics, test-development, safety, employee selection, and assessment. From 2011-2015 Paul worked at JvR Psychometrics where he focused on applied organisational research, test construction and psychometric assessment. Paul recently completed his PhD at the University of Johannesburg specialising in the computer adaptive testing of personality under the tutelage of Prof. G. P. de Bruin. In 2016 Paul joined The Ethics Institute as an internal research specialist focusing on quantitative research design, survey construction, and behavioural antecedents to moral behaviour. His primary areas of interest include quantitative research, statistical analysis, computer adaptive testing, personality psychology, item response theory, behavioural aspects of moral reasoning and conduct, and applied research. Paul also holds a strong interest in the areas of leadership profiling and selection and often gives advice to organisations on leader selection and development using psychometric inventories. He currently holds an academic affiliation with the University of Johannesburg's Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management and is a member of the International Test Commission (ITC) as well as a founding member of the World Congress of Personality. In 2016 Paul was presented with the Johann Schepers Award for outstanding and pioneering work in the field of psychometrics.

The Psychology of “Bad”: Making Ethical Decisions in the Presence of Social Forces

Presented by Dr. Paul Vorster (Research Specialist- Industrial Psychologist: The Ethics Institute)

Making ethical decisions can be a difficult prospect. This is partly because individuals do not have a very well-defined frame of reference regarding ethics and also, because social forces may override ethical decision-making in practice. In this workshop we provide frameworks for making better ethical decisions, discuss the sources of ethics we use as a frame of reference, and investigate the social forces that can override our ethical decision-making. By looking more closely at the major normative ethical theories namely utilitarianism, deontology and virtue theory and how these interact with group conformity, group apathy, role conformity, the bystander effect and the obedience to authority; this workshop aims to ‘inoculate’ individuals against social forces and their impact on ethical decision-making. Additionally, we will discuss the ‘bystander revolution’ pioneered by famous social psychologist Philip Zimbardo and how individuals can act as social activists regarding ethics and its implementation in practice.

 

Data analysis with Mplus: A gentle introduction
 Ian Rothmann 
Ian Rothmann 

Ian Rothmann

Ian Rothmann

Sebastiaan (Ian) Rothmann is a professor in Industrial Psychology and Director of the Optentia Research Focus Area (www.optentia.co.za) at the North-West University in South Africa. He obtained a B. Com degree (1980, cum laude), majoring in Industrial Psychology, a Higher Diploma in Education (1981; cum laude), and Honours (1982; cum laude) and Master’s (1986; cum laude) and PhD (1996) degrees in Industrial Psychology. He became Director of Optentia in 2011. Ian’s research interest is the assessment and development of human potential and flourishing in institutions within multicultural contexts. He has a special interest in quantitative research methods and participated in trained extensively in various statistical software programs (including SPSS, AMOS, Mplus, and R). He is author/co-author of 197 peer-reviewed journal articles and chapters in handbooks. Ian is an honorary member of the Society of Industrial and Organi­zational Psychology in South Africa (SIOPSA), an international affiliate of the American Psychological Association, and a member of the Academy of Management (USA).

Website: www.ianrothmann.com

Twitter: @ianrothmann

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Data analysis with Mplus: A gentle introduction

Presenter: Prof. S. Rothmann

Many researchers in the positive psychology are using, or want to use, latent variable modelling to investigate their theories. This workshop aims to introduce participants to MPlus, a popular and flexible software package for doing latent variable modelling. The workshop will introduce latent variable modelling using both variable and person-centred methods. Basic models relevant for social scientists will be discussed, including exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, multiple regression analyses, latent profile/class analysis, multiple group models, and cross-lagged panel models. Important topics such as moderation and mediation and testing for measurement invariance are covered. No previous knowledge of Mplus is assumed, but prior knowledge of SEM, although not mandatory, will make this workshop more useful.

 

Promoting sustainable, global and positive peace in everyday life: the role of participatory methods for community-based programs
 Helena Águeda Marujo  Luís Miguel Neto
Helena Marujo Luís Miguel Neto

Helena Águeda Marujo

Helena Águeda Marujo

Helena Águeda Marujo has a PhD in Psychology (Psychotherapy and Educational Counseling) from the University of Lisbon. She is currently an Assistant Professor at Instituto Superior de Ciências Sociais e Politicas (ISCSP), University of Lisbon, where she serves as the Executive Coordinator of the Master Program in Development of Politics for Human Resources Management and also as the Executive Coordinator of the Executive Master in Applied Positive Psychology (English and Portuguese tracks). She is a Senior Researcher at Centro de Administração e Politicas Publicas (CAPP, University of Lisbon) and coordinates a Mission Unit on Wellbeing University (ISCSP-Wellbeing), which was the recipient of a Merit Prize in 2017. She co-launched the project Contributions for Public Happiness, at Lisbon University, financed by the Rectorate. She was one of the organizers of the Program for Peace Education, launched in March 2017 at ISCSP, Lisbon University. She has more than 60 scientific publications, including the authorship of six books. One of the books is Positive Nations and Communities (Springer, 2013), currently being translated into Chinese.  She is a member of the Board of Directors of the International Positive Psychology Association. She co-organized the 1st and the 2nd Portuguese Psychology Conference, on the topics of Positive Nations and of Positive Communities and Relational Goods. She is na invited scholar at North-West University in South Africa and at St. Joseph University in Macao.

Luís Miguel Neto

Luís Miguel Neto

Luís Miguel Neto is an Assistant Professor at Instituto Superior de CiênciasSociais e Politicas (ISCSP), University of Lisbon, where he is the Scientific Coordinator of the Executive Master on Applied Positive Psychology. He launched the project Contributions for Public Happiness, at Lisbon University, in 2015/2016, funded by the Rectorate. He is now one of the leaders of the Program for Peace Education, launched in March 2017 at ISCSP, Lisbon University, which was the recipient of a Merit Award. He has received his EdD in Family Therapy from the University of Massachusetts, USA (1995) and he got a post-graduate degree on Systemic Family Therapy from Sevilla University in Spain (1996). He is a Senior Researcher at Centro de Administração e PoliticasPublicasat Lisbon University. He was the leader, during ten years, for the SAFI – a Family and Individual Outpatient Clinic that served the community on a free-of-charge basis and was also a training center in Solutions-Oriented Brief Psychotherapy. He is an invited scholar at St. Joseph University in Macao and North-West University in South Africa).He was a researcher from the Centre of Estudos de LínguaTradicional from Universidade Nova de Lisboa, and currently, he is a full member of the Center for Administration and Public Policy (CAPP), University of Lisbon. He was an External Examiner for Luton University in the UK for five years, linked with the Kensington Consultation Centre. He has published more than 50 papers and book chapters, nationally and internationally, co-edited a book for Springer on Positive Nations and Communities and co-authored 5 books on psychology for the general public. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the International Positive Psychology Association.

Promoting sustainable, global and positive peace in everyday life: the role of participatory methods for community-based programs

Sustainable experiences of global peace area fundamental route to the enhancement of collective life and commonality.

Being at the same time extremely vulnerable and indispensable, peace is constantly and dramatically challenged in our contemporary world. All forms of relational violence, from cyber aggression to domestic, environmental and animal cruelty, injustice, inequality,poverty, corruption, nuclear proliferation, global terrorism, and environmental pollution, they all promote ways of living that separate us from one another and our deep humanity, and install daily feelings of fear and insecurity, hate and revenge, helplessness and despair. They not only compromise our quality of life in common, deflating the hope and optimism of future generations but also impact individual, relational and collective well-being - current and perspective. They also put our species and the planet in danger.

In order to continue deepening ways of building better lives, positive psychology needs therefore to begin its third wave, embracing resolutely, from an protective, pro-active and positive point of view, some of humanity's most difficult and painful challenges - from the inability of inner harmony to the many faces of shortage of peace and absence of humanness.

Today, as a scientific expression of multiple cultures and worldviews, positive psychology has an even more fundamental, individual, social, political and moral role.

When are we able to live in peace together? What conditions permit the emergence of empathy, compassion, others-centeredness, forgiveness, reconciliation, reciprocity, fraternity? How does dialogue around our collective strengths promote peaceful ways of communicating and relating? 


Introducing and reviewing methods and techniques designed to “change a community/family/organizational a time”, this workshop addresses participatory methods, relational goods and appreciative dialogues, in particular when involving the ones who usually do not connector are somehow silenced. The aim is, therefore, to bring into discussion, and to put into practice, methods, theories and case studies exploring community programs that intervene at the speech act level through positive, dialogic and relational approaches.Reconsidering the place of methods such as Appreciative Inquiry, The World Caféand others, in order to connect positive psychology to the construction of peaceful ways of being together, ultimately the workshop is intended to establish an open and fruitful interchange between several relational interventions that aspire for more positive and livable interactions, closer and safer communities and more peaceable nations - towards a harmonic and public happiness (Felicitas Publica). It also intends to discern the place of those practices in the current history of positive psychology, and their role in the prospects of a more enlightening co-constructed, humane, sustainable and collective future.

 

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